Oatmeal Banana Nut Feature

Build-Your-Own Oatmeal Bowls

I did not grow up eating oatmeal.  This probably seems odd given that I grew up on a farm. After all, it’s hearty, healthy, cheap and comforting. We didn’t eat oatmeal.  We used it … in cookies and meatloaf. Only a few years ago did I discover what I was missing.  If you aren’t a fan or if you currently tear open a paper packet and add water and microwave it for a couple minutes, I have three words for you:

Steel. Cut. Oats.

oatmeal bowls

It is trendy to use the word “bowls” as not just a vehicle for holding ingredients but as a descriptor of a meal that is beautiful and composed and satisfying. In this case, oatmeal may be the main ingredient of this breakfast but it’s the flavor profile you build by choosing toppings and mix-ins that keeps your spoon returning to the bowl.

Oatmeal Buffet 3

How to choose?

Think of your favorite quick breads, muffins or doughnuts …

Banana Nut Bowl

Oatmeal Banana Nut 2

Bananas — Walnuts — Cinnamon — Brown Sugar

Berry pecan Bowl

Oatmeal Berry Pecan

Strawberries — Blueberries — Candied Pecans — Honey — Nutmeg

Apple crisp bowl

Oatmeal Apple Crisp

Apple Sauce — Apple Slices — Walnuts — Cinnamon

Or go eccentric with a peanut butter-banana-bacon or chocolate-hazelnut-coconut (Nutella, hazelnuts and toasted unsweetened coconut flakes) bowl.

The combinations are endless and personal. Kids love to make choices. Let them create their own masterpiece … just help them decide appropriate amounts. You never know. You’re little chef might come up with the most unexpected concoction and they might make a pretty delicious discovery!

what makes your stomach growl?

Mix-Ins: peanut/almond/cashew butter, hazelnut spread, jams or jellies, apple sauce, brown sugar
Drizzles: flavored vinegars, honey, maple syrup
Nuts: pecans, hazelnuts, almonds, pepitas, walnuts
Fruit: raisins, dried cranberries, bananas, apples, berries, peaches, pears
Toppings: chocolate, granola, bacon, coconut
Spices: cinnamon, nutmeg, cardamom, ginger, turmeric

CAUTION: It is very easy for this nutritious breakfast to become a sugar-bomb. Find your balance and maintain control of your proportions. Oatmeal is the main ingredient. Choose your healthiest toppings first. Go light on the sweeteners.

overnight oatmeal recipe

Print Recipe
Oatmeal Bowls
Warm, comforting, nutritious, simple and customizable ... oatmeal is the perfect breakfast. Using steel-cut oats and an overnight soaking method, everyone in your family can create their own perfect bowl!
Oatmeal Banana Nut Feature
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
6-8 bowls
Ingredients
  • 4 cups water
  • 1 cup steel-cut oats
  • 1/2 teaspoon Salt
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
6-8 bowls
Ingredients
  • 4 cups water
  • 1 cup steel-cut oats
  • 1/2 teaspoon Salt
Oatmeal Banana Nut Feature
Instructions
  1. Bring 4 cups of water to a boil in a medium saucepan.
  2. Rinse oats with water in a fine-mesh sieve until water runs clear.
  3. Add oats and salt to boiling water. Stir. Remove from heat and cover.
  4. Allow to "soak" overnight.
  5. In the morning, stir and slowly reheat over low to medium-low heat, stirring frequently to avoid scorching.
  6. Gently simmer for 10 minutes or until oatmeal is thick and creamy. Remove from heat. Serve immediately or allow to cool and refrigerate.
  7. To Reheat: Place desired amount in a microwave-safe bowl with 1/4 cup of liquid (milk, water, coffee, etc) and stir to combine. Microwave on high for 30 seconds at a time until hot.

 

Steel-Cut Oatmeal Pin

Instant Pot Egg Bites Feature

Instant Pot Egg Bites

The words “pressure cooker” initiate strong images of my mom standing near our stove, carefully watching a round gauge on a big, metal, enclosed pot. It was not a time to ask her questions or distract her with anything less than a major emergency. Her focus was on that gauge and making sure to adjust the temperature of the burner just enough to keep the pressure from getting too high or too low.

my introduction to instant pot egg bites

When I started hearing people talk about these new, programmable, electric pressure cookers, I was curious, but skeptical. My curiosity started outweighing my skepticism as my Pinterest feed showed more and more uses … stock, dry beans, rice, roast, baked potatoes, cheesecake … in less time and with no gauge-watching. And then my cousin made me egg bites in her Instant Pot. I have never tasted eggs with such an airy texture.

You guessed it … one of those 8-quart Instant Pots was delivered by Santa. I love that guy! I quickly ordered an accessory kit which included a silicone egg mold so I could make those fluffy egg bites. After posting a picture of my first attempt (Parmesan, spinach and prosciutto), recipe requests filled the comments.

start with the basics

It all starts with 3 large eggs and two tablespoons of “liquid”.

I told you it was simple.

The Simple Scrambled version contains 3 large eggs whisked together with 2 tablespoons of milk and 1/2 teaspoon each of salt and pepper. Divide the mixture evenly between the seven molds (not  filling over 75-80%) and cover the mold with aluminum foil.

Instant Pot Egg Bites Tools

NOTE: Not all pressure cookers are the same. I am describing the process I used on
my particular pressure cooker. Make sure you read all directions and safety
precautions for using your pressure cooker and follow those instructions.

Pour 12 ounces of water into the bottom of the Instant Pot. Place egg mold on a compatible, removable trivet and lower into Instant Pot. Lock lid into place, making sure the pressure release valve is set on “SEALING”. Press the “PRESSURE COOK” button and set the time for 10 minutes. It will take a few minutes for the proper pressure level to be reached. At this point, the timer will start counting down from 10. When the ten minutes are over, allow the Instant Pot 12 more minutes to naturally release pressure. Press “CANCEL” and carefully move the pressure release lever from “SEALING” to “VENTING”. Make sure your hand and fingers are not above that lever as hot steam and water will escape as soon as it is moved.

Instant Pot Pressure Valve

The red valve pictured above is the pressure indicator. When it is raised above the lid like this, there is still pressure inside the Instant Pot and it is not yet safe to open. This valve will drop down, indicating that the pressure has dropped and it is safe to open the lid. Open the lid, carefully lift the lid up and away from you so the remaining steam escapes away from your face and hands.

Instant Pot Egg Bites

Using some hot pads (the ones pictured above came with the accessories kit I ordered), remove the  trivet from the Instant Pot and carefully remove the aluminum foil. Allow the egg bites to cool for 2-3 minutes, invert onto a plate, gently apply pressure to the outside of the silicone mold until egg bites drop out.

how do you like your eggs?

Instant Pot Egg Bite Platter

The recipe was just too simple so I just had to experiment a little … like four different versions.

Left to right in the picture above:

  1. Simple Scrambled
  2. Parmesan, Spinach & Prosciutto
  3. Pesto
  4. Salsa and Cheese
  5. Deviled

SIMPLE SCRAMBLED: This is the basic recipe described above.

PARMESAN, SPINACH & PROSCIUTTO: Place a little Parmesan and sautéed spinach in the bottom of each mold. Pour basic Simple Scramble egg mixture into molds and top with a little more Parmesan.

PESTO: Substitute pesto for milk in basic Simple Scramble egg mixture.

SALSA & CHEESE: Substitute salsa for milk in basic Simple Scramble egg mixture. Place a little shredded Mexican blend cheese in each mold and pour egg mixture into molds. Top with a little more cheese. Garnish with thinly sliced jalapeño.

DEVILED: Starting with the 3 large eggs, add 2 Tablespoons mayonnaise or salad dressing, 1 Tablespoon pickle juice, a dash of paprika, a dash (or four) of Tabasco sauce and 1 teaspoon yellow mustard. Garnish with a roasted red pepper strip and/or paprika.

ON THE GO … THE TABLE … Or THE TOAST

It’s a super-convenient breakfast. These can be made ahead, refrigerated and then reheated as needed. (If you are going to reheat them in a microwave, make sure you do so using medium power. Reheating on high power will toughen the eggs and make them rubbery.)

It’s not even necessary to reheat. Think of deviled eggs. They are enjoyed cold.

Speaking of deviled eggs … make these egg bites your go-to appetizer for tailgates, picnics, potlucks and parties.

My favorite way to munch of these cute little bites?

Instant Pot Egg Bite Avocado Toast

Avocado Toast.

Drop the mic.

Instant Pot Egg Bites Pin

Almost Homemade Gravy Feature

The Ultimate (Store-Bought) Gravy Transformation

Like icing on a cake, gravy takes mashed potatoes from yummy to yuuuuu-mmmmmmmmyyyyyyy! Let’s face it though … making gravy is an art. It requires those amazing drippings from slow-roasted meat, the right amount and kind of thickener and a good teacher. Art takes time. Time isn’t always on your side. Enter the ready-to-serve option: never as good as homemade but convenient. What if it could be closer to homemade? All it takes are a few simple tricks.

Gravy from the Store

awareness

This post came into existence because of a text I received from a good friend right before Thanksgiving. She was planning a family meal that would be transported to her mother-in-law’s home and wanted to use a box of turkey gravy she purchased but wanted to know if I had any tips on how to “beef” up (she’s funny that way) the flavor. Not being familiar with the product I asked if she had ever tried it and, if so, what she didn’t like. It was a little bland and quite thin.

Where to start? You can’t bump up the flavor of something if you don’t know what went into making it. Highlight the existing flavors.

She sent me the ingredients; onions, garlic and “spices” were on the list. The word “spices” caught my attention and it made me think of all the amazing flavors that accompany a good Thanksgiving dinner: sage and thyme, lemon and orange, clove and nutmeg. Simple things make a big difference.

The most important thing you can do, before you add anything, is to taste what you have. The most important thing you can do after you add something is to taste it again. Your taste buds will guide you. Pour that gravy into a pan, warm it up and grab a spoon.

Gravy - Herbs

Freshness

Canned/jarred/boxed/frozen foods sacrifice freshness for convenience and longevity. The easiest way to restore some of that freshness is to add … you guessed it … something fresh. Adding a sprig of fresh herbs while the gravy is warming will make a big difference. Pair sage and thyme with turkey, rosemary with beef and ham, and basil and thyme with chicken. One dry bay leaf will save the day for any kind of gravy.

NOTE: Be sure to remove the bay leaf and any herb stems before serving.

Taste it again.

Gravy - Acidity

brightness

An effort to add “brightness” to food has nothing to do with appearance. It is an effort to add some zing to the flavors already present, much like adding lemon juice to a glass of water. It is the acidity of the lemon that achieves the zing. Fresh citrus (juice or zest) and even vinegar can make a surprising difference. Again, think of the seasonality of your meal. Lemons go well with chicken and spring-time dinners. Oranges pair perfectly with fall meals like turkey. Pineapple is always a delicious addition to ham. Although apples don’t fall into the citrus category, a splash of apple-cider vinegar will work well with a pork or beef roast.

Gravy - Spices

Another option is to add spices. Lemon Pepper, nutmeg (especially for white gravy), allspice or ginger will add warmth and depth and make a big impact.

The obvious question is “how much”? Start small. You can always add more. Even a quarter teaspoon of spice, a half teaspoon of fresh citrus zest or a teaspoon of vinegar will go a long way.

Taste it again.

saltiness

We have long been taught that it is the solution to blandness. Ready-to-serve foods seldom require the addition of salt. There are two big clues to help you decide if you should add salt or not. First, look at the label. See where salt falls in the ingredient list. If it’s one of the first ingredients, plenty of salt has already been added. Second, taste it. If, after making the addition of herbs, spices and zest/vinegar, it still needs improvement, add black pepper. Salt and pepper balance each other. Still think it needs salt? Add a little at a time and remember the mashed potatoes will also provide some salt to each bite.

thickness

Too thick? Remember to warm the gravy before you decide if it needs thinning. The easiest way to thin something is to add water but I don’t recommend it. You will not be happy with the flavor. Instead, add the appropriate broth (chicken, beef, turkey or vegetable) in small amounts until the desired consistency is reached.

Too thin? All-purpose flour will do the trick. Mix one tablespoon of flour with one tablespoon of water or broth and dissolve completely. Drizzle half of this mixture into warm gravy and whisk until combined. The flour needs to “cook out” so bring the gravy to a low boil and simmer, stirring frequently, as the gravy thickens. Add more of the mixture if necessary and continue cooking.

Taste it again. A “chalky” flavor (don’t ask me how I know what chalk tastes like … you’ll know it when you taste it) just means it needs to simmer longer.

Gravy - Bouillon and Broth

other gravy tips

Bouillon: I highly recommend Better Than Bouillon as an alternative to bouillon cubes. It is stored in the refrigerator, comes in beef, chicken, turkey and vegetable flavors, is organic and reduced sodium and has easy-to-pronounce ingredients. Adding one-half teaspoon to bland gravy will intensify the flavor without diluting the consistency.

Worcestershire Sauce: A splash of Worcestershire sauce will add spice and zing to the gravy. Be careful. It will also add salt and a darker color.

Well-Seasoned Mashed Potatoes: Make sure you also taste your mashed potatoes. Properly seasoned potatoes will make your properly seasoned gravy taste even better!

spoiler alert

Warning: There are a lot of options in this post. The idea is to provide suggestions that, in the right combination, will work with your pantry and refrigerator. Pick one or two (maybe three) of these suggestions but don’t try adding them all or the gravy will taste worse than it did straight out of the jar.

My friend blended a little turkey bouillon with some flour and water and added thyme. She said it was “perfect”! Not gonna lie. I’m pretty pleased. I learned some new things AND was able to help my friend via text messages with more than 500 miles between us.

It’s like icing on a cake … a mashed potato cake.

Gravy Transformation Pin

 

Lebkuchen (German Honey Cookies)

Grandma Glienke’s German Honey Cookies

Baking cookies at Christmastime is more than a sugar-loaded, flour explosion in my kitchen. As is the case for so many foods, it is the creation and recollection of memories. It is a hands-on recitation of “remember when”. Story after story surfaces about successes and failures, who made which delicacy best and the tricks and tips of those people who taught us the recipes. There is always the regret of not asking more questions regarding the history of those family favorites.

bitte, danke and lebkuchen

The first German word I ever learned was either Bitte (please), Danke (thank you) or Lebkuchen (German Honey Cookies). I spent a lot of time with my Grandma Glienke throughout the year but especially during Weinachten (Christmas). I would help her wrap presents, clean house, put gumdrops on her gumdrop tree, and make cookies. As she aged, it became more of a challenge for her to make all the different types of cookies each year. Luckily, just as I was getting to the age of actually helping and not just “helping”, my mom invited her to come to our house to bake. Not long after, my Grandma Hinkeldey joined us and the four of us joined forces to produce a ridiculous amount of cookies. Sugar cookies, almond cookies (with egg white brushed on top for a shine), peppernuts (German and Danish), peanut butter blossoms, thumbprints (birds nests), snowballs (pecan crescents) and, of course, Lebkuchen.

Lebkuchen (German Honey Cookies)

 

At that age, I was mostly interested in those with chocolate or frosting. Almonds, pecans, walnuts, nutmeg, and clove had little appeal to me. I helped with those simply to get to the ones I wanted. It was unclear to me why anyone would choose a “plain” honey cookie when they could get a stomach ache over a properly adorned sugar cookie … or three.

Brown is a christmas color

With age comes wisdom. I will still grab a well-frosted sugar cookie when I get the chance … and probably ask you for the frosting off of your cookie too … but brown has become my favorite color for Christmas. Give me molasses, honey, nutmeg, clove, cinnamon, almonds, pecans and hazelnuts. There is a warmth to these ingredients that is so appropriate during this season.

baking lessons with a side of history

Lebkuchen (German Honey Cookies)

In an effort to learn more about this cookie that made an annual appearance on our Christmas scene, I found this article, A Brief History of Lebkuchen: German’s Heart-Shaped Gingerbread Cookie. Dating back to the 13th century, these “honey cakes” continue to be very popular at the German Christmas markets, are typically heart-shaped and often the size of a dinner plate. Gee … sure sad to know that tradition didn’t trickle down.

The recipe has many variations, some sweeter and some with more spice. Some are decorated with frosting and others with nuts. Some are glazed and some have chocolate (NOTE: chocolate is also brown). As with so many recipes, the adaptations are often regional and subject to ingredients that are readily available and/or affordable.

I wish I had asked Grandma more about her memories of making Lebkuchen. When and why did they change from the traditional round or heart-shape cookies to the Christmas shapes like bells and trees? Did she make these with her mom? Her grandma? Were they her favorite cookie?

the ever-important slice of bread

As mentioned above, the tips and tricks of any recipe passed down from generation to generation are priceless. The trick I learned for this recipe from my Grandma Glienke has nothing to do with measuring, mixing, baking or decorating. It is a way to extend the life of these cookies. If you happen to bake the cookies a little too long or if they lose their chewiness and turn hard and crunchy, simply put a few of the cookies in a plastic bag with a slice of bread for an hour. The moisture from the bread will soften the cookies and restore their chewiness. Now that is a valuable lesson.

adding to my notes

Next year I think I will make two changes to this recipe. First, I will use my heart-shaped cookie cutter (the big one). Second, I will incorporate my other favorite brown ingredient into the recipe by dipping some of the cookies in chocolate.

Don’t worry. There will be plenty of bells and trees and stars.

The traditions will continue.

recipe

Print Recipe
Lebkuchen (German Honey Cookies)
Lebkuchen (German Honey Cookies)
Cook Time 10-15 minutes
Passive Time 1 day
Servings
100 4" Cookies
Ingredients
  • 5 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup dark brown sugar packed
  • 2/3 cup honey
  • 2/3 cup dark corn syrup
  • 4 tablespoons water
  • 2 eggs lightly beaten
  • walnuts or peanuts
  • 1 slice bread see notes
Cook Time 10-15 minutes
Passive Time 1 day
Servings
100 4" Cookies
Ingredients
  • 5 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 cup dark brown sugar packed
  • 2/3 cup honey
  • 2/3 cup dark corn syrup
  • 4 tablespoons water
  • 2 eggs lightly beaten
  • walnuts or peanuts
  • 1 slice bread see notes
Lebkuchen (German Honey Cookies)
Instructions
  1. Sift together flour, baking soda, cinnamon and cloves.
  2. In a medium saucepan, combine brown sugar, honey, corn syrup and water. Bring to a boil and simmer for 3 minutes, or until sugar is completely dissolved and ingredients are well combined. Cool to lukewarm and pour into mixer bowl.
  3. Add eggs and one-third of the flour mixture to the bowl and mix on low speed until well combined. Add another third of the flour mixture and continue to mix, scraping the sides of the bowl to ensure flour is mixed into the batter. Add the final portion of the flour mixture and stir it in by hand. If you have dough hooks for your mixer, you may be able to do all of the mixing with your mixer.
  4. Store dough in the refrigerator for at least one day (see storage comments in the post above).
  5. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  6. Apply a light coating of cooking spray to cookie sheets or line with parchment paper.
  7. Remove about 1/6 of the dough from the bowl and return remaining dough to refrigerator. Roll dough out on a well-floured, cool surface until it is 1/4" thick. Cut out shapes with well-floured cookie cutters and transfer to cookie sheets, leaving an inch between cookies.
  8. Add some peanuts or walnuts to the shapes, if desired.
  9. Bake for 10-15 minutes, depending on thickness and size. Remove from oven and allow to cool on cookie sheet for 1-2 minutes before removing to a cooling rack or parchment paper.
Recipe Notes

When shapes have been removed from the rolled-out dough, gather the dough scraps and return to refrigerator. When all the original dough has been rolled out once, gather the scraps together and roll out again.

If cut-outs stick to countertop, try running a well-floured spatula underneath to avoid destroying the desired shape.

Why would I list a slice of bread in the ingredients? It's actually an amazing and useful trick. If the honey cookies lose their chewiness and become hard, place a few cookies in a bag with a piece of bread for an hour or two. The moisture from the bread will transfer to the cookies and soften them. Don't leave the bread and cookies together too long though or sogginess will ensue ... and who needs that.

Lebkuchen (German Honey Cookies) Pin

 

Pomegranate and Rosemary Mule

Pomegranate and Rosemary Moscow Mule

If I wasn’t able to convince you to make the pomegranate simple syrup for the Pomegranate Fruit Salad, maybe this will get your attention.

pomegranate and rosemary moscow mule

Pomegranate Mule

Pretty, huh?

Tastes even better.

My intent was for you to make the fruit salad, double the simple syrup and then try these Mules with the extra syrup. Not a rule-follower? It’s ok. I too am attracted to pretty and fragrant beverages that involve gin.

Just do me a favor? At least try the fruit salad. It’s pretty awesome.

If you have yet to click on either of the “fruit salad” links above, I’m going to force you to do so. Why? You need the recipe for the simple syrup and it’s right there in the Pomegranate Fruit Salad recipe.

make the syrup

Pomegranate, Orange and Black Pepper Syrup

Once you have a jar of syrup like this, you are minutes from …

Pomegranate Rosemary Mule

gather other ingredients

You will also need:

  • gin
  • ginger beer
  • fresh lime
  • pomegranate seeds (optional, but awesome)
  • fresh rosemary sprigs

find a mule mug or a pretty glass

Pour one ounce of gin into your mug or glass. Add one tablespoon of the syrup, a squeeze of lime juice and ice cubes. Pour 4-6 ounces of ginger beer into mug/glass and stir with the rosemary sprig. Sprinkle a few pomegranate seeds on top and garnish with a slice of lime.

Don’t have a mule mug? All of your pretty glasses in the dishwasher? No worries. There are worse things than Solo cups.

black pepper? gin?

If you have been following this blog for even a short time, you will have likely picked up on the fact that I am an improviser. Two of my favorite things about this cocktail are the addition of black pepper to the syrup and the substitution of gin for vodka.

Black pepper seems like an odd thing to add to a syrup but, just as the tartness of the pomegranate balances the sweetness of the syrup, the black pepper gives it all a hint of warmth. It’s subtle. So subtle, in fact, that I am likely to add a little cracked black pepper to my next mug along with the sprinkle of pomegranate seeds. I like the contrast.

If you haven’t already called me out on this, Moscow Mules are typically made with vodka. Unless it’s in a Bloody Mary, I’m a gin girl. You can use vodka (might I even recommend the pepper flavored vodkas for this one?). I’m sticking to gin.

We can be friends.

Cheers to that!


Everyday’s a Holiday Pomegranate Fruit Salad

My go-to fruit salad for a weeknight meal was always the simple combination of strawberries, grapes, Mandarin oranges and pineapple. There was something about the bright colors and the combination of the tart and sweet that pleased my family. It was my secret weapon for battling the groans that would likely come when the broccoli or peas made an appearance on the table.

fruit salad upset

Oftentimes, in the fall or winter, strawberries would either be of poor quality or much too expensive (or both) and my go-to fruit salad became a no-go. I needed an alternate bribe. Enter the perfectly timed arrival of one of my favorite recipe magazines. I honestly can’t tell you which one it was and I can’t even say the picture was all that inviting but the words “pomegranate syrup” caught my attention.

Apples, pears, oranges, kiwi? All readily available and seasonal fruits in the fall and winter.

Pomegranates? Pomegranate Juice? Pomegranate Seeds? Fresh on the health scene. Beautiful. New to me.

Good enough to act as a bribe for the consumption of peas? Absolutely!

Holiday Pomegranate Fruit Salad

I modified the original recipe to include my favorite combination of fruits but you can absolutely use whatever you like, have on hand or is available in your stores/garden. I also made a bit of an unusual addition to the syrup …

pomegranate syrup

Pomegranate, Orange and Black Pepper Syrup

Pomegranate seeds and juice are antioxidant, anti-inflammatory powerhouses. The seeds add, not only nutritional benefits to this salad, but a nice texture contrast to the fruit. Using 100% pure pomegranate juice may be a bit more expensive than other juice options but the tartness of this juice keeps the syrup from getting too sweet. Adding a bit of orange zest and black pepper provides just the right amount of acid and warmth. Yes, black pepper sounds like a weird thing to add to a fruit salad but you have got to trust me on this one … it’s amazing!

I would even go so far as to recommend that you make a double batch of this syrup.

Pomegranate and Rosemary Mule

Got your attention, didn’t I?

I am also working on a recipe using this syrup to glaze pork loin slices.

Right?

It’s okay. You can take a minute to add 100% Pomegranate Juice to your grocery list. I’ll wait for you.

And, while you’re at it … add peas and broccoli to your list.


Print Recipe
Pomegranate Fruit Salad
Fresh fruit salad gets a holiday makeover with a touch of a tangy pomegranate and orange syrup. This recipe is sure to be a success at any meal.
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Servings
8 cups
Ingredients
  • 1/3 cup bottled pomegranate juice
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon fresh grated orange zest
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • 2 large navel oranges
  • 2 apples
  • 2 pears
  • 2 cups grapes
  • 1/2 cup pomegranate seeds optional
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Servings
8 cups
Ingredients
  • 1/3 cup bottled pomegranate juice
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon fresh grated orange zest
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • 2 large navel oranges
  • 2 apples
  • 2 pears
  • 2 cups grapes
  • 1/2 cup pomegranate seeds optional
Instructions
  1. Pour pomegranate juice into a small saucepan and stir in sugar. Bring slowly to a boil over low heat, stirring constantly, until sugar dissolves (about 5 minutes). Remove from heat and add orange zest and black pepper. Cool to room temperature.
  2. Peel and section oranges. Core apple and pears and cut each into 1/2 inch slices or chunks. Combine oranges, apples, pears and grapes in a bowl.
  3. Pour syrup over fruit and stir gently to coat. Sprinkle pomegranate seeds on top.
Recipe Notes

One 15 oz can of Mandarin oranges (drained) can be substituted for the fresh orange segments.

Other fruit can be substituted or added as desired (e.g. bananas, grapefruit, kiwi, blueberries, pineapple, etc.).


Pomegranate Fruit Salad Pin